Print, signed, unframed print from Mort Kunstler titled "Brave Warrior" circa 1979

M Kunstler Brave Warrior.jpg
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M Kunstler Brave Warrior.jpg
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Print, signed, unframed print from Mort Kunstler titled "Brave Warrior" circa 1979

469.00

Print, signed, unframed print from Mort Kunstler titled "Brave Warrior" circa 1979

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Print, signed, unframed print from Mort Kunstler titled "Brave Warrior" circa 1979

The third painting I did in 1979 on Plains Indians charging on horseback was Brave Warrior. For an artist, it is challenging to take the same subject matter, especially when intrigued by it, and make several completely different paintings. In Brave Warrior I used a very low eye level to give the warrior a heroic look and came in close for a more detailed focus. I completed the painting just in time for my one-man show at Hammer Galleries in New York City on October 22, 1979. The painting was still wet when it was hung for the opening night preview, and it was sold that night.

Everything the warrior wears or carries is made from hide, hair, wood or bone. He is adorned with the eagle feather, which is a mark of bravery. His small, round shield is of particular interest. Decorated with a picture of a buffalo calf, it would have been made of two or three layers of buffalo hide. It could not spare the warrior from bullets, but it could sometimes deflect stone-tipped arrows like those clutched by the rider beside him in this scene. The quirt tied to the warrior's right wrist was probably also made from buffalo hide. His bridle would have been made of woven horsehair.

The long, curved staff he carries is a coup stick. The ancient practice of touching an enemy with a stick, instead of killing him, demonstrated a warrior's bravery and deadliness. The name attached to the practice is French, because in early contacts with these tribes French observers noted the practice of striking the enemy with the staff and called the hits "coups" or blows. Around the campfire, warriors entertained each other and competed for higher status in the tribe by reciting their deeds of bravery. Recalling the number of times they had slain or struck an enemy was called "counting coup." {Mort Kunstler 1979}

Print Edition 5000 measuring 18 x 14 unframed; signed by Mr. Kunstler at publishing in 1979