Pomo tribal "Clap Stick" (drum alternative) by Nhatsa - {Pete Heflin}, Kiowa-Apache heritage

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Pomo tribal "Clap Stick" (drum alternative) by Nhatsa - {Pete Heflin}, Kiowa-Apache heritage

595.00

Pomo tribal "Clap Stick" (drum alternative) by Nhatsa - {Pete Heflin}, Kiowa-Apache heritage

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Pomo tribal "Clap Stick" (drum alternative) by Nhatsa - {Pete Heflin}, Kiowa-Apache heritage

A very rare and unique piece of history as it relates to the California tribes at the turn of the 20th century. Handmade ifrom a single piece of wood {gleaned from Nothern California} this clap stick is a rare work. Faithfully reproduced by Nhatsa from works he studied at museums clap sticks were utilized by California tribes as a way to maintain a connection to Mother Drum during the temporary prohibition of drums throughout California. 

Clap sticks became an alternative to drums due to legislation by the early governments California which tried to outlaw drums as an instrument. Early government officials stated that tribal drums were an "instrument of warfare" and that every time a drum was used, wars broke-out among the settlers and the indigenous people. Due to the enforcement of this legislation the Holy people of the Pomo tribe creadted the clap stick. Clap sticks were used to emulate the beat of Mother Drum and thus allowing the culture to continue. 

This clap stick was beaded to show reverance as a connection the spirit world. The beadpattern is classic geometric emulating the topography of the Pomo homeland region.

Fully functional as a musical instrument this unique clap stick measures approximately 18 inches long . This one-of-a-kind clap stick is signed by Nhatsa on the bottom side.