Vintage Mid 20th Century Pottery Vessel By Fannie Nampeyo ~ Hopi- Tewa "Storm Pattern" Design

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Vintage Mid 20th Century Pottery Vessel By Fannie Nampeyo ~ Hopi- Tewa "Storm Pattern" Design

1,950.00

Vintage Mid 20th Century Pottery Vessel By Fannie Nampeyo ~ Hopi- Tewa “Storm Pattern” Design

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Vintage Mid 20th Century Pottery Vessel By Fannie Nampeyo ~ Hopi- Tewa "Storm Pattern" Design

Fannie Nampeyo Polacca was the youngest of Nampeyo of Hano's three daughters. She was born in the Hopi- Tewa Corn Clan home atop First Mesa, on the Resrvation in Arizona. Fannie was initially given the name Popongua or Popong-Mana (meaning "Picking Pinions") by the older women of her father Lesou's family, and either missionaries or health-care workers later gave her the name "Fannie."[3]

The highest level of education Fannie Nampeyo completed was third grade. In the early 1920s she married her cousin, Vinton Polacca, going against tradition of marrying outside the Corn Clan. Shortly thereafter pottery making became an important part of Fannie’s life. The couple moved to Sand Hills where Vinton worked a cattle ranch. There she began taking pottery seriously. From 1934-1937 they lived and worked as ranchers but left ranching so Vinton could work in government schools. The couple took their family to Keams Canyon, where all their children eventually completed high school. While in Keams Canyon, Polacca had a profitable tamale business. During this time, Fannie Nampeyo increasingly worked with her mother Nampeyo, whose eyesight was diminishing due to trachoma. Fannie helped her mother with pottery painting and decorating, and also assisted her father with polishing. Early works created by Fannie and her mother were signed simply "Nampeyo" by Fannie, since Nampeyo could not read or write, but later they began signing pieces made together as "Nampeyo Fannie". Pieces made solely by Fannie were signed "Fannie Nampeyo" and usually included a drawn corn symbol.

This lovely piece measures 3" X 6"